Report

Net zero jobs

An analysis of the employment impact of a net zero emissions target in Australia
Publisher
Labour market disruption Renewable energy Carbon emissions Emissions reduction Employment forecasting Labour market Employment Australia
Resources
Attachment Size
Net zero jobs 4.72 MB
Description

The 2019 election provided firm evidence that Australians reject the idea of risking jobs and economic prosperity for the sake of reducing emissions. The election was framed as the ‘climate election’ by the political left, whose policies were rejected by the Australian people after they failed to give regard to the negative impact those policies would have on the economy and society.

This report presents an analysis of the effects of a net zero emissions target on jobs. It is broken up into three sections.

The first section finds that a target of net zero emissions would impose significant and irreparable economic and social damage due to the infliction of mass job losses. This report estimates that up to 653,600 jobs would be directly put at risk from a net zero emissions target. This estimate does not include potential indirect job losses which could occur in related industries and the communities where at risk jobs are vital.

The second section provides an analysis of Commonwealth electoral divisions and ranks electorates by those which contain the most jobs put at risk from a net zero emissions target. The report finds that 17 of the top 20 electorates with jobs put at risk by a net zero emissions target are currently held by the Coalition government.

The final section outlines recent changes in the labour force, demonstrating that for each new renewable activity job created between 2009-10 and 2018-19, five manufacturing jobs were destroyed. The majority of jobs created since the election of the Rudd government in 2007 have been in industries with high public sector employment, and the promise of new, green jobs to replace manufacturing ones has not materialised.

Publication Details
License type:
All Rights Reserved
Access Rights Type:
open