Report

VET for secondary school students: post-school employment and further training destinations

Vocational education and training Secondary education Australia
Description

Students who did VET for Secondary School Students (VfSSS) studies were more likely than those who did not to be in full-time and permanent employment five years after their studies. Those who had undertaken a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship were also among the most likely to be in full-time and permanent employment and in jobs related to their VfSSS studies. In comparison, those who did not do VfSSS studies were more likely than those who did to be in casual or part-time employment, with substantial proportions currently studying, or having gained a bachelor’s degree or higher. Although the most common post-school qualifications for VfSSS students were VET qualifications, around 20% of VfSSS students had also completed a bachelor’s degree, suggesting that students in these programs are not a homogenous group.

Key messages:

  • Evidence from the 2011 and 2006 cohorts indicates that students who undertook a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship as part of their VfSSS program were among the most likely to be employed in a full-time and permanent job five years later. They were also more likely to be employed in an occupation relevant to their VfSSS course than students who did not undertake an apprenticeship or traineeship.
  • In terms of the overall match between the intended occupation of VfSSS and the actual job, the strongest links were in trade-related study areas, although strong links were also observed across other occupational groups.
  • A comparison between the 2011 and the 2006 cohorts found that at all qualification levels there was an increase in the proportion of students who were engaged in, or had completed, post-school study five years later, with a substantially greater share of Indigenous students, and students who spoke a language other than English in the home, continuing with further study.
  • A comparison of the destinations of VfSSS students with those of non-VfSSS students, four to five years after finishing school, reveals that VfSSS students were more likely to report VET certificates and diplomas as their highest level of qualification completed. They were less likely to have completed year 12, and a bachelor’s degree or higher. They were also more likely to be in full-time and permanent or ongoing employment, noting that a considerable proportion of non-VfSSS students were still studying, mostly at university.
  • Choosing the right VET course and pathway can make a substantial difference to secondary school students looking for a direct transition from school into an apprenticeship or full-time ongoing employment.
Publication Details
ISBN:

978-1-925717-45-7

License type:
CC BY